Space

Space

Enhancing Discovery Here on Earth and into the Great Unknown

Baker Street Scientific works alongside global scientific leaders, enterprising orbiting platforms, and courageous space pioneers to provide vital analytics and deeper insights for mission support.

Whether revealing new information for extraterrestrial discovery, providing deep analytics for global interconnectivity, or providing mission support for cosmic exploration, Baker Street Scientific science and technologies are uniquely positioned to integrate into both legacy and next-generation systems to enhance science and mission success today and into the future. 

ORBITING SOLUTIONS

BakerSCI technologies augment the processing of sensing and communications data, whether captured or relayed through orbiting platforms, for greater scientific discovery and increased communications integrity.  Whether processed here on Earth or on-station miles above, our S&T can operate in the environments where they are needed most.

EXTRATERRESTRIAL OPERATIONS

In an unpredictable environment, your data analysis can’t afford to be unpredictable.  Baker Street Scientific’s algorithms and processes deliver consistent, high-speed performance regardless of where the processing needs to occur.  Whether studying through telescopes, researching on the lunar surface, or exploring the furthest reaches of space, BakerSCI’s S&T is mission ready.

BakerSCI Results of M87 Black Hole Imagery


POSTED: 05/06/2019 @ 11:54 AM


In what we are calling Project Agnostos™, BakerSCI has been running unprecedented advanced analytics tools the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration’s original M87 black hole image and the subsequently released sequence of 4 images from across 7 days. Below is a very small sample of our most recent processing results which reveal striking and disruptive new discoveries. Beyond the below, BakerSCI has discovered additional, even more compelling and intriguing, unknown features and activity that may challenge and corroborate known and theoretical science. Currently, these additional findings are being shared with select experts to work together on hypothesizing what these findings might be. These will be posted here in the not-to-distant future.

BakerSCI’s powerful unique processing has discovered several new unknowns in the EHTC original, April 10th released, M87 black hole image.

Very fluid and intertwined “strings” within the even horizon. Are these strings, trails, streams, folds, artifact, overly convenient coincidences of perfectly aligning feature edges, or maybe even our exposure of the workings of EHTC’s algorithms on data and it’s circularity in their formation of the image?

The black hole’s shadow has, we’ll call it “material” for now, within it, thus showing the hole is a much smaller well defined feature.

The nature of the shapes of the different features doesn’t necessarily support movement in any particular direction. Is it more of an undulation or wobbling?

On April 24th EHT released a sequence of 4, including the original, images (lower resolution than the original). BakerSci processed the sequence, and even though these new EHT images were at a substantive lower resolution, we have discovered important and puzzling new information and activity within the sequence.

Even though somewhat discernible in the original images, BakerSCI reveals indiscernible detailed variations in and the evolution of the bright orange lower mass (Cheshire Cat smile) of the event horizon across the image sequence.

The black hole shadow has a distinct amount of variation in its shape and size across the 4 days of capture.

Even though the sequence is across a mere 7 “earth” days, the strings have a proportionally important amount of variation in their shapes and lengths and their points of origin and destination. 

BakerSCI’s deep associative and contextual analysis finds quantifiable metrics of the organization and order in the features and well differentiated anomalies that exist the M87 black hole data.


POSTED: 04/15/2019 @ 6:00 AM


Image Credits: *1 © Event Horizon Telescope.  All images © Baker Street Scientific unless otherwise noted.